Elections and Electoral Registration

    Information
    Most years, we organise an election to allow local people to vote for who they want to represent them and their area on the Council.


    Elections are usually held on the first Thursday in May. In Chorley, a third of the Council is elected each year, with the following third the year after and so on, until their term is up and the process begins again. Every fourth year we hold the elections for Lancashire County Council.

    If a councillor steps down from their seat and it becomes available we will hold a by-election. We also organise elections on behalf of other government organisations.

    The quickest way to register to vote is online at www.gov.uk/register-to-vote 

    Postal vote and proxy vote applications can be downloaded at www.yourvotematters.co.uk for those residents who are unable to attend a polling station. However, postal vote pack will only be issued one or two weeks before the election.

    If you need help with registering to vote or applying for a postal vote or proxy voteplease contact the council directly on 01257 515132
     
    If you would like more information on becoming a Councillor click here to access Be a councillor webpage https://beacouncillor.co.uk/

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  • General Election - Results

    GENERAL ELECTION
       

    Chorley Constituency  - Labour hold

    Turnout – 73%

     

    Fenn, Stephen John

    Liberal Democrat

     

    1, 126

    Hoyle, Lindsay Harvey

    Labour Party

    30, 745 (Elected)

     Lageard, Peter Dino

    The Greet Party

    530

     Mood, Caroline Jane

    The Conservative Party Candidate

    23, 233

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  • 2016 Election Results

    Chorley local elections:
    You can see a full breakdown of the borough council election results below:

    The composition of the council is: Labour 30 seats, Conservative 14 seats, Independent Group 2 seats and National Health Action Party councillor 1 seat.

    Adlington and Anderton - Lab hold - turnout 40.41%
    Dorothy Livesey - Conservative - 598
    Philip William Pilling - Liberal Democrat - 113
    Andrew Whitson - Green Party - 183
    Peter Francis Wilson - Labour - 1,425

    Brindle and Hoghton - Cons hold - turnout 47.26%
     Yvonne Marie Hargreaves - Labour - 125
    Sheila Mary Long - Conservative - 350
    Steve Williams - Independent - 315

    Chorley East - Lab hold - turnout - 34.99%
    Zara Khan - Labour - 1,176
    Aidy Riggott - Conservative - 222
    Christopher Suart - UKIP - 348

    Chorley North East - Lab hold - turnout 34.2%
    Adrian Lowe - Labour - 1,049
    Philip Adrian Ellis Loynes - Conservative - 331
    Tom Shorrock - UKIP - 268

    Chorley North West - Ind hold - turnout 52.5%
    Steve Holgate - Labour - 547
    Sandra Mercer - Conservative - 182
    Julia Winifred Mary Smith - UKIP - 129
    Joyce Snape - Independent - 1,547

    Chorley South East - Lab hold - turnout 36.4%
    Alistair Ward Bradley – Labour & Co-operative Party - 1,261
    Dominic Keiran Jewell - Conservative - 452
    Shaun Jones - UKIP - 243
    David Porter - Liberal Democrat - 52

    Chorley South West  - Lab hold - turnout - 31.14%
    Anthony Gee - Labour - 1,351
    Sarah Louise Kiley - Conservative - 483

    Clayton-le-Woods and Whittle-le-Woods - Cons hold - turnout 38%
    Glenda Charlesworth - Liberal Democrat - 151
    Mark Edward Clifford - Labour - 962
    Andrew Anthony Romanienko - UKIP - 203
    John Philip Walker - Conservative - 1,126

    Clayton-le-Woods North - Lab hold - turnout 33.7%
    Jean Elizabeth Cronshaw - Labour - 1,027
    Eileen Whiteford - Conservative - 636

    Coppull - Lab hold - turnout 35.6%
    Jane Louise Fitzsimons - Labour - 832
    Harold Heaton - Conservative - 271
    Simon Thomson - Liberal Democrat - 610

    Eccleston and Mawdesley - Cons hold - turnout 41.83%
    Henry William Caunce - Conservative - 953
    Stanley Joseph Ely - Labour - 823
    Mark Smith - UKIP - 292

    Euxton North - Lab hold - turnout 44.2%
    Danny Gee - Labour - 1,108
    Jeffrey Flinders Mallinson - UKIP - 169
    Alan John Platt - Conservative - 254

    Heath Charnock and Rivington - Lab hold - turnout 54.43%
    Peter Malpas - Conservative - 277
    Kim Snape – Labour & Co-operative Party - 663

    Lostock - Cons hold - turnout 39.2%
    Julia Berry - Labour - 534
    John Derek Dalton - Conservative - 602
    John Patrick Wright - Liberal Democrat - 189

    Wheelton and Withnell - Lab hold - turnout 50.26%
    Christopher France - Labour - 897
    Andrew James Snowden - Conservative - 707

    Police and Crime Commissioner for Lancashire

    You can view the results for this election here.

  • Annual Equiry Form

    Annual canvass 2016

    Every year we are required to carry out a ‘canvass’ to ensure that the electoral register is up to date.

    This year the annual canvass of all properties and electors will take place from August 2016 to the end of November 2016 in readiness for the publication of the revised register of electors on 1 December 2016.

    What we're doing
    Around the middle of August 2016 we will send a form, known as a household enquiry form (HEF), to every household in Chorley. The form will be addressed to ‘The Occupier’ and will contain the details of all those in the household who are currently registered. If we do not have any electors currently registered at an address the form will be blank.

    What you need to do
    We will ask you to confirm that the details of those living at that address and registered to vote are correct or to update the details where circumstances have changed. Anyone in the household can respond to the form but by law every household must respond. Please respond to the HEF as soon as possible as this saves the council money and avoids an officer having to visit your home. Please note that completing the HEF does not register you on the electoral roll.

    Are all the details correct?
    If the details are correct, all you need to do is follow the instructions on the HEF. You can respond online at www.elecreg.co.uk/chorley , by telephone at 0808 284 1458 or by text message to 07786209358. These options save us money but if you prefer, you may return the completed form in the post. See your HEF for further details.
     
    Updating incorrect or missing details
    If the details on the form are incorrect - for example, someone has moved away or moved in - follow the instructions on the form to let us know.

    Choose only one of the following two options:
    • respond online at www.elecreg.co.uk/chorley by entering the security codes on your form and following the instructions
    • respond by completing your form and returning it to us at the address provided.

    If you are adding a new elector at your address, that person needs to complete an additional form which we will send out in due course. Alternative they can apply to register online at www.gov.uk/registertovote and in which case we won’t need to post the extra form out.

    What happens next?
    If you confirm that there are no changes, we won't write to you again as part of the 2016 canvass.

    If you tell us there are new people eligible to be registered, we will send each person an individual registration form. This form invites that person to apply to register to vote individually. To save paper and money we strongly recommend that each individual you have added on your household enquiry form applies to register online at www.gov.uk/registertovote.

    If we are unable to verify a person’s identity from the details provided on the form or online, or the individual registration application is not fully completed, we will ask for additional documentary evidence of their identity for example a photocard driving license or passport.

    If you tell us someone has moved away, we may have to send them a further letter confirming that we intend to remove their name from the register.

    Reminders
    If we do not receive a response to the HEF by 29 August 2016 a reminder will be posted and at a later stage, if still no response is received, an officer will visit your property to obtain the required information. All individual registration forms that are not responded to will follow the same process. It is therefore important that you respond as soon as possible and preferably by using the online service.

    It is essential to respond to any communications sent to ensure you are included in the revised register that will be published on 1 December 2016. Not being included on the register means you will not be able to vote in future elections or referendums and may also affect your credit rating.

    If you move home
    Each time you change address you need to re-register to vote. The quickest and easiest way to do this is online at www.gov.uk/registertovote.You can do this at any time.

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    Frequently asked questions

    Can I complete the form electronically?
    Yes. If there are no changes to make to the details on the form, you can use the telephone/SMS/internet options.

    If you need to make changes, you can do this using the online option described above. You cannot make changes by telephone or SMS. Please do not return the form in the post if you use one of these options.

    There are people listed on the HEF that do not live here, what do I do?
    If anyone listed on the HEF is not living at your address, you can use the internet option at www.elecreg.co.uk/chorley to remove them. Alternatively you can respond using the form provided. Their name/s should be clearly crossed through and the completed form should then be returned to the Electoral Services Office in the prepaid envelope provided.

    The property is still empty.
    If there are no names listed on the HEF, please tick the relevant box in the section “Nobody eligible to register to vote?”, sign, date and return the form to the Electoral Services Office.

    Do I put down everyone who lives here?
    You need to include the name and nationality of everyone aged 16 or over who is resident and eligible to register to vote. If there are no eligible residents, you should confirm this in the section “Nobody eligible to register to vote?” and return the completed form to the Electoral Services Office.

    I’ve registered to vote on line - do I still have to fill in this Household Enquiry Form?
    Yes, you must still complete it, so that we know the details of everyone at your address.

    Do I have to fill in the Household Enquiry Form?
    By law you must complete and return this form.

  • Individual electoral registration

    The electoral registration system in Great Britain has recently changed. The new system is called ‘Individual Electoral Registration’ This started to happen in June 2014 in England and Wales.

    Previously, the ‘head of household’ was responsible for registering everyone who lived at the address, but now every individual is responsible for their own voter registration. This is called Individual Electoral Registration. The new system also means that people are now able to register online. Anyone newly registering under the new system will need to register themselves individually by filling out a paper or online form.

    Most people who are currently registered to vote have been registered automatically under the new system. They do not need to do anything and will continue to be registered to vote as usual. We will send a letter early August to let these people know that they are registered under the new system.

    A minority of people on the electoral register have not been automatically registered under the new system. It is straightforward for these people to re-register. We are writing to the people who are not automatically registered to let them know that they need to register under the new system. We included a registration form with the letter or they can register online

    The letter which you receive will tell you if you are on the open register.



    If
    • You are not on the open register you don't need to do anything
    • You are on the open register and you would like to be removed from it please complete the enquiry form
    • You have moved address you will need to regsiter to vote

    FAQ's

    Has the registration system changed?
    The electoral registration system in Great Britain has recently changed. The new system is called ‘Individual Electoral Registration’ This started to happen in June 2014 in England and Wales.

    What is individual electoral registration?
    Previously, the ‘head of household’ was responsible for registering everyone who lived at the address, but now every individual is responsible for their own voter registration. This is called Individual Electoral Registration. The new system also means that people are now able to register online. Anyone newly registering under the new system will need to register themselves individually by filling out a paper or online form.

    What is different about the new system?
    Previously, the ‘head of household’ was responsible for registering everyone who lived at the address. The new way of registering is called Individual Electoral Registration. Under the new system you will be able to register online to vote. Anyone newly registering under the new system will need to register themselves by filling out a paper or online form. The other difference is that people need to provide a few more details about themselves to register – these are date of birth and National Insurance number.

    Why has the system changed?
    Individual electoral registration gives you the right and responsibility to register yourself, instead of giving the responsibility to a ‘head of household’. As such, it encourages people to take individual responsibility for their own vote. The change has also allowed more convenient methods of registration, for example, by internet (or by telephone or in person if offered by your local authority). Because the new system asks you for a few more details before you are added to the register – your National Insurance number and date of birth – the electoral register will be more secure and more resistant to threats of electoral fraud.

    Who is responsible for changing the system?
    The system was introduced by the UK government through the Electoral Registration and Administration Act 2013 which became law on 31 January 2013. Electoral Registration Officers are implementing the change

    Do I need to do anything / do I need to re-register?
    Most people who are currently registered to vote have been registered automatically under the new system. They do not need to do anything and will continue to be registered to vote as usual. We will send a letter early August to let these people know that they are registered under the new system.

    A minority of people on the electoral register have not been automatically registered under the new system. It is straightforward for these people to re-register. We are writing to the people who are not automatically registered to let them know that they need to register under the new system. We included a registration form with the letter or they can register online

    Does the change affect how I vote?
    Voting processes haven’t changed. However, if you want to vote by post or proxy you will need to ensure that you are registered under the new system. If you haven’t already applied to vote by post, you will need to do so by 5pm 11 working days before an election to vote by post at that election.

    If you haven’t already applied to vote by proxy, the deadline is normally six working days before an election, apart from in the case of a medical emergency or if you are called away unexpectedly for work reasons, when you may be able to apply up to 5pm on polling day.

    I haven’t received the letter, what should I do?
    If you are already registered to vote, you will receive a letter telling you that there is a new voter registration system. It will also tell you if you need to do anything as a result. You may not have received your letter yet but we will be writing out in August. You need to look out for it and respond if it asks you to. If you were not already on the electoral register you will not have received a letter. You can register to vote online.

    I haven’t received a letter, what should I do?
    Most people received a letter to tell them that there is a new way to register to vote and whether they need to re-register.

    If you are currently not registered to vote, you can register online.

    If you don’t know whether you’re registered to vote, it’s possible to check under the new system by contacting us.

  • Election of Councillors in Chorley

    Chorley Council is made up of 47 Councillors spread over 20 borough wards.

    The numbers of councillors per ward is dependent on how many electors there are in each ward with the result that across Chorley there are some wards with 3 councillors, some with 2 and some with just 1 councillor, however the majority have 3.

    Councillors are elected for a 4 year term of office with elections being held by what is known as “by thirds”. This means that over a four year period, in 3 of those four years a third of the Chorley seats are put up for election each year with the 4th year being reserved for elections to Lancashire County Council.

    What this means for the electors of Chorley is that in those wards with 3 councillors there are elections every year (3 years for Chorley Council and 1 year for Lancashire County Council). For those with 2 councillors there are elections in 2 of the 3 years and for those with only 1 councillor there are elections in only 1 of the 3 years.

    For this reason whilst the majority of areas in Chorley have elections every year, in some areas there will be years when there are no local elections.

  • Mayoral petition notice

    Referendum on elected mayor
    We are required (by the Local Government Act 2000) to publish the minimum number of signatures of local electors needed to support a valid petition requiring the Council to hold a referendum on whether or not the Borough should have a directly elected Mayor.
     
    This number, known as the verification number, must be 5% of local government electors shown in the published Electoral Register each year.

    The Mayoral notice for the current year is available to download.

  • Nominations - standing in an election
    Most candidates are nominated through a political party.  However, individuals are welcome to stand in their own right.  Before you can be accepted as a candidate you must get one person to agree to propose the nomination and another person to agree to second the proposal.  Both of these people must be on the electoral register.

    Eligibility criteria for borough elections
    Candidates must be qualified to stand for election. The Local Government Act 1972, Section 79, sets out the qualifications for standing as a candidate and the grounds for disqualification of a candidate.

    Eligible candidates must be at least 18 years old; and:
      • be on the electoral register for the district, or 
      • have worked in the district for the previous year, or 
      • have lived in the district for the previous year, or 
      • have owned or rented land or other premises in the district for the whole of the previous year*

    *The previous year is calculated from the day the candidate is nominated for election. The candidate must be a Commonwealth citizen. a citizen of Republic of Ireland or a citizen of another Member State of the European Community.

    The applicant may be disqualified as a candidate for the borough elections if he or she:
      • holds a paid office under the local authority or a politically restricted post, as defined in Part I of the Local
    Government and Housing Act 1989, 
      • has been declared bankrupt in the last five years and has not repaid their debts, 
      • has been convicted of a criminal offence and sentenced to at least three months imprisonment (including any suspended sentence) within the previous five years, or 
      • is disqualified due to corrupt practices under the Representation of the People Act 1983 or the Audit Commission Act.

    Evidence required
    To stand as a candidate at any election a nomination paper must be submitted. The nomination paper gives details of name, address and political description (if any). A nomination paper has to be signed by the correct number of supporters.

    To stand as a candidate in a County or Borough election 10 electors (one proposer, one seconder and eight assentors) need to sign the nomination paper. Everyone signing the nomination paper must be included on the Register of Electors for the area in which the election is to be held. If someone signs your nomination paper and they are not included on the relevant Register of Electors, the paper will not be valid.

    Guidance notes
    Full name and home address must be included. If desired, a description can be included, such as the political party. Candidates cannot submit a nomination paper using a political party description unless they have their permission to do so and a certificate from them saying that they are authorised to use their description.

    Agents do not have to be appointed. However, during an election some candidates appoint persons to assist them in their campaign. More information on the appointment of polling and counting agents will be given once the decision is made to stand for election.

    A successful candidate would be expected to follow the Council's Code of Conduct.

    Application process
    The nomination forms to stand as a candidate are available from us. To apply for a form please contact us. There is no charge to stand as a candidate for election. However, any costs incurred by a candidate in standing for election will have to be paid by the candidate. Details of expenses will be supplied with the nomination form.
  • Registering to vote

    Individual Electoral Registration (IER) is the new voter registration system which takes effect from 10 June 2014 in England & Wales. Instead of using a household form to register to vote, each individual in the property will take responsibility for their own registration. Each person needs to supply their National Insurance number and date of birth. This will reduce the risk of fraud and inaccurate entries on the electoral register.

    In order to vote and have your say at future elections and referendums you must be on the Electoral Register. In addition some people also register to vote because they want to apply for credit. This is because credit reference agencies use the register to confirm where someone lives when they apply for credit in order to counteract fraud.

    To register to vote in Chorley you need to:
    • Live at an address in the borough
    • Be over 16 years old (although you can't vote until you are 18)
    • Be a British or commonwealth citizen
    • Be a citizen of the Republic of Ireland or other European Union state

    Monthly registration
    If your details change or you move house after the revised register is published, you can register online and you will go onto the register on one of its monthly updates. A list of of monthly publication dates is available to download.  

    Annual canvass\registration
    Every year we send registration forms to every household in Chorley and you need to make sure you respond so that your name stays on the electoral register.

    The open register
    The open register is an extract of the electoral register, but it is not used for elections. It can be bought by any person, company or organisation. For example, it is used by businesses and charities to confirm name and address details. Your name and address will be included in the open register unless you ask for them to be removed. Removing your details from the open register does not affect your right to vote.

    Register online
    Registering is simple:
    1 Visit the Register to vote website
    2 Fill in your name, address, date of birth and a few other details. You’ll also need your National Insurance number, which can be found on your National Insurance card, or in official paperwork such as payslips, or letters about benefits or tax credits.
    3 Look out for confirmation from us to say you’re registered.

  • Voting
    From the age of 18 everyone in the UK has the right to vote - this is your opportunity to have a say in the way your community and country a​​re run. In order to vote you have to be registered with us on the electoral register. You are not automatically registered, even if you pay Council Tax. Being on the register also has other benefits, when opening a bank account or applying for credit or housing, even confirming your National Lottery win.

    Postal Voting
    You can register to vote by visiting the About My Vote website. After we have received and processed your form we will write to you with confirmation that your application has been dealt with. A request for a new postal vote or a change to an existing one must be received 11 working days before polling day in order for you to vote at that election.

    Proxy Voting
    Proxy votes are when you can choose someone else to cast your vote on your behalf. For indefinite or long term proxy votes you need to specify physical or employment or study reasons as to why you are making an application. With proxy votes, where a particular election is specified, you need to provide details of the circumstances by which you cannot reasonably be expected to go to the polling station. Requests for new proxy votes or to cancel a proxy or appoint a different proxy must be received by 5pm 6 working days before polling day. For each person who applies, a separate form must be completed.
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