Elections and Electoral Registration

    ​By Election - 4 July

    Residents living in the Eccleston and Mawdesley ward will be going to the polls on 4 July to fill the council vacancy left behind following the sad death of Henry Caunce.

    To be able to vote in this election you must live in the borough ward, and be registered to vote. The deadline to register to vote in this election is Tuesday, 18 June 2019.

    For more key dates relating to this election expand the By Election 2019 key dates heading below.

    Elections 2019
    The polls have closed and Labour retains control of Chorley Council, gaining five seats from the Conservatives. The new political make up of the council is Labour 37, Conservative 8 and Independent 2. The full results are in the tab below.

    European Parliamentary Elections
    The votes in the European Parliamentary Elections for Chorley are:

    Change UK - 1,013
    Conservative - 3,310
    English Democrats - 189
    Green Party - 3,448
    Labour - 5,013
    Liberal Democrats - 4,651
    The Brexit Party - 11,582
    UK European Union Party - 121
    UK Independence Party - 1,086
    Mohmmad Aslam - 24
    Tommy Robinson - 519
    Rejected ballot papers - 244

    Register to Vote  
    To be able to vote at elections and referendums you need to be included on the electoral register. You only need to register once to vote in every election, referendum that you are entitled to vote in.

    You can apply to register to vote in future elections online at www.gov.uk/registertovote or if you contact us direct on 01257 515132, elections@chorley.gov.uk to request a registration form. Forms should be returned to Chorley Council, Town Hall, Market Street, Chorley, PR7 1DP.

    For more information download the Local Borough Council Elections – FAQ under the Download it section.

    If you need help with registering to vote or applying for a postal vote or proxy vote please contact the council directly on 01257 515132.
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  • 2019 Results

    Results will be updated here on Thursday night.

    Ward ​CANDIDATE ​PARTY ​Votes ​Turnout
    ​Adlington and Anderton ​Paul Edward Lowe
    June Molyneaux

    Philip William Pilling
    ​Conservative
    Labour & Co-op hold
    Liberal Democrat
    ​694
    1,063

    239
    ​34.33%
    49 rejected votes
    ​Chisnall ​Martin Francis Bashforth
    Julia Berry

    Kerry Ann Walsh
    ​Conservative
    Labour & Co-op gain
    UKIP
    ​414
    587

    281
    ​39.22%

    ​Chorley east ​Clare Denise Grew
    Terry Brown
    ​Conservative
    Labour hold
    ​294
    1,091
    ​27.48% 
    41 rejected votes
    ​Chorley North East ​Phil Loynes
    Marion Lowe
    ​Conservative
    Labour hold
    ​400
    948
    ​29.34% 
    56 rejected votes
    ​Chorley North West ​Pat Haughton
    Nicola Adshead
    Aaron Beaver
    Stefan Krizanac
    ​Conservative
    Green
    Labour hold
    Liberal Democrat
    ​666
    246
    978
    104
    ​43.8%
    34 rejected votes
    ​Chorley South East ​Neil Gardiner Baglow
    James Fletcher Melling
    Paul James Walmsley
    ​Conservative
    Green
    Labour hold
    ​524
    248
    946
    ​30.3%
    31 rejected votes
    ​Chorley South West ​Marie Elizabeth Gray
    Jane Elizabeth Weston
    Margaret Mary Lees
    Diane Elizabeth Curtis
    ​Conservative
    Green
    Labour hold
    Liberal Democrat
    ​340
    189
    878
    188
    ​26.7% 
    29 rejected votes
    ​Clayton-le-Woods North ​Carole Margaret Billouin
    Steve Murfitt
    Gail Ormston
    ​Conservative
    Labour hold
    Liberal Democrat
    ​438 
    767
    259
    ​30.76%
    50 rejected votes
    ​Clayton-le-Woods West & Cuerden ​Mick Muncaster
    Peter Alexander Gabbott
    John Ward

    ​Conservative
    Labour gain

    UKIP
    ​566
    650

    234
    ​35.48% 
    18 rejected votes
    ​coppull ​Sandra Mercer
    Alex Martin Hilton
    ​Conservative
    Labour hold
    ​400
    927
    ​27.6%
    67 rejected votes
    ​Eccleston & Mawdesley Martin William Boardman
    Catherine Ann Donegan
    Richard George Croll
    Conservative hold

    Labour
    UKIP
    1066

    649
    250
    ​39.32%
    26 rejected votes
    ​Euxton South Debra Platt

    Terry Howarth
    Conservative hold
    Labour
    ​620

    554
    ​38.6%
    35 rejected votes
    ​lostock ​Doreen Dickinson
    Paul Mark Sloan
    ​Conservative
    Labour gain
    ​633
    648
    ​38.45%
    49 rejected votes
    ​Clayton-le-woods & whittle-le-woods ​Gregory Ian Morgan
    Mark Edward Clifford
    Glenda Charlesworth
    ​Conservative
    Labour gain
    Liberal Democrat
    ​948
    1,121
    254
    ​36.2%
    47 rejected votes
    ​Astley & buckshaw ​Peter Malpas
    David John Harrison
    Laura Jane Lennox
    ​Conservative
    Green
    Labour & Co-op gain
    ​683
    223
    833

    ​33.49%

    26 rejected votes


     

  • By Election - 4 July 2019 

    18 June - is the deadline to register to be able to vote to take place in this year's elections.

    5pm, 19 June - last day to apply for postal vote or make changes to existing postal votes or proxy/proxy postal votes.

    5pm, 26 June - last day to apply for a new proxy vote.

    Please note, postal votes are issued between one to two weeks before the election.

    If you are an existing postal vote or your new postal vote application has been received by the elections team before 10 June, you can expect to receive your postal vote pack from 21 June.

    If you have applied for your postal vote after 10 June but before 19 June deadline, you can expect to receive your postal vote from 26 June. 

    If these dates are not convenient for you, you may wish to consider appointing a proxy to vote on your behalf.

  • When will I be registered?

    The Register of Electors is updated every year and is produced to allow eligible people to vote in elections. The register is also amended on a monthly basis under what is known as Rolling Registration.
     
    Here are the statutory publication dates of rolling registration for 2019

    ​If we receive your application by: ​Your details will be changed on:
    ​11/12/2018 ​02/01/2019
    10/01/2019​ 01/02/2019​
    ​07/02/2019 01/03/2019​
    ​08/03/2019 01/04/2019​
    09/04/2019 01/05/2019​
    10/05/2019 03/06/2019​
    ​07/06/2019 01/07/2019​
    10/07/2019 01/08/2019​
    ​09/08/2019 02/09/2019​


    Note, because the Annual Canvass of Electors is carried out in the autumn of each year there are no monthly updates to the register between the 1st September and the 1st December. As Such in 2019 any changes we receive after the 9th August 2019 will only take place on the register published on the 1st December​ 2019.

  • Postal votes

    How do I apply for a postal vote, or make changes to an existing postal vote?

    If you would like to vote by post, you first need to complete a postal vote application form which you can downloaded by clicking here.  Completed forms need to be return to the Electoral Services team.

  • Proxy Votes

    If you are unable to vote in person but don not want to receive a postal vote, you can ask someone to vote on your behalf. This is called a proxy vote.

    You can ask anyone to act as your proxy - as long as they are registered to vote and they’re allowed to vote in the same type of election.

    You can be a proxy for 2 people at the same election, or more if the extra people are close relatives.

    Please note your proxy will need to vote at the polling station which you would normally attend.  You therefore need to consider if your proxy would require a postal proxy.

    The deadline for new proxy applications (not postal proxy), excluding emergency proxy applications, is 5pm, 25 April.  The deadline for a postal proxy is 5pm, 18 April.​ 

  • Individual electoral registration

    The electoral registration system in Great Britain has recently changed. The new system is called ‘Individual Electoral Registration’ This started to happen in June 2014 in England and Wales.

    Previously, the ‘head of household’ was responsible for registering everyone who lived at the address, but now every individual is responsible for their own voter registration. This is called Individual Electoral Registration. The new system also mean​s that people are now able to register online. Anyone newly registering under the new system will need to register themselves individually by filling out a paper or online form.

    Most people who are currently registered to vote have been registered automatically under the new system. They do not need to do anything and will continue to be registered to vote as usual. We will send a letter early August to let these people know that they are registered under the new system.

    A minority of people on the electoral register have not been automatically registered under the new system. It is straightforward for these people to re-register. We are writing to the people who are not automatically registered to let them know that they need to register under the new system. We included a registration form with the letter or they can register online

    The letter which you receive will tell you if you are on the open register.



    If
    • You are not on the open register you don't need to do anything
    • You are on the open register and you would like to be removed from it please complete the enquiry form
    • You have moved address you will need to register to vote

    FAQ's

    Has the registration system changed?
    The electoral registration system in Great Britain has recently changed. The new system is called ‘Individual Electoral Registration’ This started to happen in June 2014 in England and Wales.

    What is individual electoral registration?
    Previously, the ‘head of household’ was responsible for registering everyone who lived at the address, but now every individual is responsible for their own voter registration. This is called Individual Electoral Registration. The new system also means that people are now able to register online. Anyone newly registering under the new system will need to register themselves individually by filling out a paper or online form.

    What is different about the new system?
    Previously, the ‘head of household’ was responsible for registering everyone who lived at the address. The new way of registering is called Individual Electoral Registration. Under the new system you will be able to register online to vote. Anyone newly registering under the new system will need to register themselves by filling out a paper or online form. The other difference is that people need to provide a few more details about themselves to register – these are date of birth and National Insurance number.

    Why has the system changed?
    Individual electoral registration gives you the right and responsibility to register yourself, instead of giving the responsibility to a ‘head of household’. As such, it encourages people to take individual responsibility for their own vote. The change has also allowed more convenient methods of registration, for example, by internet (or by telephone or in person if offered by your local authority). Because the new system asks you for a few more details before you are added to the register – your National Insurance number and date of birth – the electoral register will be more secure and more resistant to threats of electoral fraud.

    Who is responsible for changing the system?
    The system was introduced by the UK government through the Electoral Registration and Administration Act 2013 which became law on 31 January 2013. Electoral Registration Officers are implementing the change

    Do I need to do anything / do I need to re-register?
    Most people who are currently registered to vote have been registered automatically under the new system. They do not need to do anything and will continue to be registered to vote as usual. We will send a letter early August to let these people know that they are registered under the new system.

    A minority of people on the electoral register have not been automatically registered under the new system. It is straightforward for these people to re-register. We are writing to the people who are not automatically registered to let them know that they need to register under the new system. We included a registration form with the letter or they can register online

    Does the change affect how I vote?
    Voting processes haven’t changed. However, if you want to vote by post or proxy you will need to ensure that you are registered under the new system. If you haven’t already applied to vote by post, you will need to do so by 5pm 11 working days before an election to vote by post at that election.

    If you haven’t already applied to vote by proxy, the deadline is normally six working days before an election, apart from in the case of a medical emergency or if you are called away unexpectedly for work reasons, when you may be able to apply up to 5pm on polling day.

    I haven’t received the letter, what should I do?
    If you are already registered to vote, you will receive a letter telling you that there is a new voter registration system. It will also tell you if you need to do anything as a result. You may not have received your letter yet but we will be writing out in August. You need to look out for it and respond if it asks you to. If you were not already on the electoral register you will not have received a letter. You can register to vote online.

    I haven’t received a letter, what should I do?
    Most people received a letter to tell them that there is a new way to register to vote and whether they need to re-register.

    If you are currently not registered to vote, you can register online.

    If you don’t know whether you’re registered to vote, it’s possible to check under the new system by contacting us.

  • Election of Councillors in Chorley

    Chorley Council is made up of 47 Councillors spread over 20 borough wards.

    The numbers of councillors per ward is dependent on how many electors there are in each ward with the result that across Chorley there are some wards with 3 councillors, some with 2 and some with just 1 councillor, however the majority have 3.

    Councillors are elected for a 4 year term of office with elections being held by what is known as “by thirds”. This means that over a four year period, in 3 of those four years a third of the Chorley seats are put up for election each year with the 4th year being reserved for elections to Lancashire County Council.

    What this means for the electors of Chorley is that in those wards with 3 councillors there are elections every year (3 years for Chorley Council and 1 year for Lancashire County Council). For those with 2 councillors there are elections in 2 of the 3 years and for those with only 1 councillor there are elections in only 1 of the 3 years.

    For this reason whilst the majority of areas in Chorley have elections every year, in some areas there will be years when there are no local elections.

  • Nominations - standing in an election
    Most candidates are nominated through a political party.  However, individuals are welcome to stand in their own right.  Before you can be accepted as a candidate you must get one person to agree to propose the nomination and another person to agree to second the proposal.  Both of these people must be on the electoral register.

    Eligibility criteria for borough elections
    Candidates must be qualified to stand for election. The Local Government Act 1972, Section 79, sets out the qualifications for standing as a candidate and the grounds for disqualification of a candidate.

    Eligible candidates must be at least 18 years old; and:
      • be on the electoral register for the district, or 
      • have worked in the district for the previous year, or 
      • have lived in the district for the previous year, or 
      • have owned or rented land or other premises in the district for the whole of the previous year*

    *The previous year is calculated from the day the candidate is nominated for election. The candidate must be a Commonwealth citizen. a citizen of Republic of Ireland or a citizen of another Member State of the European Community.

    The applicant may be disqualified as a candidate for the borough elections if he or she:
      • holds a paid office under the local authority or a politically restricted post, as defined in Part I of the Local
    Government and Housing Act 1989, 
      • has been declared bankrupt in the last five years and has not repaid their debts, 
      • has been convicted of a criminal offence and sentenced to at least three months imprisonment (including any suspended sentence) within the previous five years, or 
      • is disqualified due to corrupt practices under the Representation of the People Act 1983 or the Audit Commission Act.

    Evidence required
    To stand as a candidate at any election a nomination paper must be submitted. The nomination paper gives details of name, address and political description (if any). A nomination paper has to be signed by the correct number of supporters.

    To stand as a candidate in a County or Borough election 10 electors (one proposer, one seconder and eight assentors) need to sign the nomination paper. Everyone signing the nomination paper must be included on the Register of Electors for the area in which the election is to be held. If someone signs your nomination paper and they are not included on the relevant Register of Electors, the paper will not be valid.

    Guidance notes
    Full name and home address must be included. If desired, a description can be included, such as the political party. Candidates cannot submit a nomination paper using a political party description unless they have their permission to do so and a certificate from them saying that they are authorised to use their description.

    Agents do not have to be appointed. However, during an election some candidates appoint persons to assist them in their campaign. More information on the appointment of polling and counting agents will be given once the decision is made to stand for election.

    A successful candidate would be expected to follow the Council's Code of Conduct.

    Application process
    The nomination forms to stand as a candidate are available from us. To apply for a form please contact us. There is no charge to stand as a candidate for election. However, any costs incurred by a candidate in standing for election will have to be paid by the candidate. Details of expenses will be supplied with the nomination form.
  • Annual Canvass

    The annual canvass of electors has now closed. 

  • Voting
    From the age of 18 everyone in the UK has the right to vote - this is your opportunity to have a say in the way your community and country a​​re run. In order to vote you have to be registered with us on the electoral register. You are not automatically registered, even if you pay Council Tax. Being on the register also has other benefits, when opening a bank account or applying for credit or housing, even confirming your National Lottery win.

    Postal Voting
    You can register to vote by visiting the About My Vote website. After we have received and processed your form we will write to you with confirmation that your application has been dealt with. A request for a new postal vote or a change to an existing one must be received 11 working days before polling day in order for you to vote at that election.

    ​​

    Proxy Voting
    Proxy votes are when you can choose someone else to cast your vote on your behalf. For indefinite or long term proxy votes you need to specify physical or employment or study reasons as to why you are making an application. With proxy votes, where a particular election is specified, you need to provide details of the circumstances by which you cannot reasonably be expected to go to the polling station. Requests for new proxy votes or to cancel a proxy or appoint a different proxy must be received by 5pm 6 working days before polling day. For each person who applies, a separate form must be completed.
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