19 January 2015

Special service to remember victims

​PEOPLE from different faiths and cultures are being invited to take part in a special memorial service being held in Chorley to remember all those who died in the Holocaust and other acts of genocide.
We are very proud to have been selected as the only town in Lancashire to host a candle to mark 70 years since the liberation of the concentration camp


​The service, on Saturday 24 January, will mark Holocaust Memorial Day which this year has the theme ‘Keep the Memory Alive’ as it commemorates the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau in Nazi-occupied Poland.


As part of the commemorations, Chorley has been chosen as one of just 70 venues across the country to host a candle designed by leading sculptor Sir Anish Kapoor, who is renowned for the ArcelorMittal Orbit at the Olympic Park in London.


Councillor Peter Wilson, deputy leader of Chorley Council, said: “We are very proud to have been selected as the only town in Lancashire to host a candle to mark 70 years since the liberation of the concentration camp. This year also marks the 20th anniversary of the genocide in Bosnia.


“Holocaust Memorial Day is held every year to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust, the genocides in Bosnia, Cambodia, Rwanda and other atrocities across the world. It is important we keep the memory alive so that we can help build tolerance and understanding of different faiths and cultures.”


Chorley’s candle will be lit after the service at the cenotaph in Astley Park at a gathering in The Lancastrian at the Town Hall with speeches, poetry and refreshments. Anyone who would like to attend is asked to meet at Astley Park gates, Park Road, at 10.45am on Saturday 24 January.


Kinga Gray-Grzeczynska, Director of the Holocaust Memorial Service, said: “We will remember the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the concentration camp and the estimated six million people killed in camps. We will also remember the 20th anniversary of the genocide in Srebrenica, Bosnia, where 8,000 men and boys were murdered; and this will also be an opportunity to remember the victims of the Paris terrorist attack earlier this month.


“The ceremony in Chorley has always been well supported in the past and I hope it will be again this year as everyone, whatever their faith and culture, is invited to join us in remembering the victims of the Holocaust and acts of genocide or victims of terrorism.”