Council tax

​Council tax is payable by residents as a way of contributing to local services. Most homes are subject to council tax and the bill is calculated using the value of the property at April 1 1991.

The amount you pay depends on the valuation band of your property. There are eight valuation bands based on the value of properties in 1991. They range from Band A for properties worth up to £40,000 to Band H for people living in homes worth over £320,000. The bands and value of properties is determined by the Government's Valuation Officer. 
 
If you have recently moved house or if you are new to the borough you should let us know immediately by completing the report a change of address online form.  
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  • Appeals
     
    You may be able to appeal against your valuation band if:
    • You moved into your home in the last six months and the building has been altered since the 1991 valuation or
    • The area where you live has changed in a way which could affect the value of your home.
     
    For more information contact the Valuation Office Agency.
     
    You can also appeal if you have been refused a discount, exemption or relief or if you don't think you should be paying council tax. If you wish to appeal on these grounds contact us.
     
    If you decide to appeal you must continue paying your council tax. We will adjust your future payments or refund any amounts you have overpaid if your appeal is successful.
  • Completion notices

    Local authorities can serve completion notices on the owners of buildings which have been completed or can be reasonably expected to be completed within three months.

    These notices propose a completion date for the building. You can help us to set the correct completion date by allowing an internal inspection of the property.

    It is not necessary for works such as the final installation of sanitary fittings, kitchen units, central heating boiler, internal decorations, fences, paths, road works and footway to be finished in order for us to consider the property to be substantially complete.

    If you do not agree that outstanding work can be completed by the date shown on the completion notice you must contact us immediately to explain the reason why you disagree. If we are unable to change our decision you may then appeal to the Valuation Tribunal Service, for more information click on the Valuation Tribunal Service ‘Useful Link’.

  • Discounts and premiums 

    The following information is intended as guidance only and is not a full statement of the law.

    There are various discounts that you may be able to claim to reduce your bill. If you claim a discount and your circumstances change you must let us know within 21 days of the change or face a penalty.

    Types of discounts and premiums  Description 
    ​Empty, unoccupied and unfurnished (0 - 6 months)  ​A discount of 50% may apply where a property is empty (unoccupied and substantially unfurnished) and runs from the date that the furniture is removed. This discount ends after a six-month period or earlier if furniture is placed in the property. 

    If an empty home becomes occupied, or furnished, for a period of less than six weeks and then falls empty again, it will only resume a 50% discount if there is any of the original six months discount period remaining. 

    Occupation of an empty (unoccupied and substantially unfurnished) home for less than six weeks does not give rise to a new discount period. 
    Empty, unoccupied and unfurnished (6 - 24 months)  ​A discount of 25% may apply where a property is empty (unoccupied and substantially unfurnished) and has been for a period of 6-24 months. 
    ​Long-term empty premium For the purpose of this premium a 'long-term empty' home is a property that has been unoccupied and substantially unfurnished for at least 24 months. 

    From 1 April 2019 Chorley Council has decided to set the premium at 100% so the full charge for a long-term empty home will be 200%. 

    The changes to the premium are intended to encourage owners of long-term empty homes to bring their properties back into use. They also support work undertaken by the Council to reduce the number of long-term empty properties and make better use of existing housing in the borough. 

    Our policy includes an exception to the charge of a 100% premium for:

    • Properties which have been empty and substantially unfurnished for more than 24 months where the property is being marketed actively for sale or let in line with average prices within the local area. 

    This exception is effective from the date the property is marketed for sale or let for a maximum period of 6 months, after which the 100% premium would apply. 

    Exceptions to the premium may also apply for empty annexes and properties left empty by service personnel.
      
    Our policy also includes that in special circumstances requests to the Council to waive the Council Tax long-term empty premium may be considered, under delegated powers, by the Executive Member (Resources).
    ​Empty, unoccupied and unfurnished homes undergoing major repair work or structural alteration ​A discount of 50% may apply where a property is empty, unoccupied and substantially unfurnished and needs major repair works before anyone can live there. It includes homes which are currently undergoing this work. This discount can apply for a maximum of 12 months. To apply download the major repair work application form.
    ​Job-related accommodation ​A 50% discount may be available to individuals who live in ‘job-related dwellings’ but who are liable for council tax on another property. This applies in England, Scotland and Wales. A ‘job-related dwelling’ is defined as one which is:

    ‘provided by reason of their employment or for their spouse [or civil partner by reason of that person's] employment, in any of the following case': 

    (a) where it is necessary for the proper performance of the duties of the employment that the employee should reside in that dwelling;
    (b) where the dwelling is provided for the better performance of the duties of the employment, and it is one of the kinds of employment in the case of which it is customary for employers to provide dwellings to employees;
    (c) where, there being a special threat to the employee’s security, special security arrangements are in force and the employee resides in the dwelling as part of those arrangements.15

    Ministers of religion and members of service personnel, who have a second home in England but who live in a job-related dwelling in England, Scotland or Wales, may obtain a 50% discount on that second home.
    ​Single occupier discount ​The full council tax bill assumes that there are two adults living in a property. If only one adult lives there as their main home, the bill may be reduced by 25%.

    You can apply for this discount using our 'Single occupier discount form'.
    Disabled relief ​If you or someone who lives with you needs a room, additional bathroom or kitchen or space for a wheelchair because of a disability, you may be entitled to have your bill reduced to the level of the next lowest band, or 1/9th if already a band A property.

    You can apply for this relief using our 'Disabled relief application form'.
    Annexes​  ​From 1 April 2014 a discount of 50% has been introduced for annexes which are: 

  • (a) 
    occupied by a relative of the person liable to pay 
    (b) the council tax of the main dwelling; or unoccupied' as the person living in the main dwelling is using the annex as part of their main home

    Please note you may be able to claim an exemption if the annex is:

    (a) occupied by a dependent relative; or
    (b) unoccupied and cannot be let separately from the main dwelling without a breach of planning control
  • ​Care leavers Council Tax support grant Lancashire County Council provide support grants for Care Leavers (aged 18-25) who are living independently, are liable for Council Tax and satisfy their qualifying conditions.

    For more information, please contact Lancashire County Council on 0300 123 6720 and request a council tax grant as you are a care leaver. A personal adviser will then arrange to see you to check if you are eligible for the grant.​
     

    Other Discounts

    Certain people are not counted as 'paying adults' and therefore a discount may be available if only one adult or no adults in the property are counted. These include:

    ​Apprentices ​​Apprentices employed for the purposes of learning a trade, business, profession, office, employment or vocation, undertaking a programme of training leading to an accredited qualification. Their salary must be no more than £195.00 per week before any deductions for income tax and national insurance.
    Full time students and student nurses​ Full-time students and student nurses - a full time course requires attendance for at least 24 weeks with at least 21 hours of study per week.​
    ​​​Students under the age of 20  ​Students under 20 on a qualifying course at or below the following standards:

    (a) A Level 
    (b) Higher Scottish certificate of education 
    (c) National certificate of the Scottish vocational educational council
    (d) Scottish vocational qualification level III

    The course must last for more than 3 calendar months with more than 12 hours of study per week. Tuition is usually carried out between 8am and 5:30pm. 
    ​Child benefit payable  ​18 and 19-year olds for whom child benefit is payable.
    ​School or college leavers  ​School or college leavers who are under the age of 20 and left school or college on or after 1 May in any year after undertaking a qualifying course of education.
    ​Foreign language assistants ​Foreign language assistants who are classed as students, registered with the British Council and have a current appointment at a school or other educational establishment in Great Britain.
    ​Youth trainees ​Youth trainees who are under 25 and have an approved individual training plan.
    ​Spouses, civil partners or dependents of foreign students ​A foreign student’s spouse, civil partner or dependent who is prevented from working or claiming benefits.
    Persons with severe mental impairment​ ​People who are severely mentally impaired and are entitled to or in receipt of one of the following benefits:

    (a) Incapacity benefit 
    (b) Employment and support allowance 
    (c) Attendance allowance 
    (d) Severe disablement allowance 
    (e) Highest or middle rate care component of disability living allowance
    (f) An increase in disablement pension for constant attendance 
    (g) Disability element of working tax credit
    (h) Unemployment supplement 
    (i) Constant attendance allowance payable under the industrial injuries or war pension schemes
    (j) Unemployability allowance payable under the industrial injuries or war pension schemes
    (k) Income support, which includes a disability premium because of incapacity for work
    (l) Personal Independence Payment (PIP) - Standard and enhanced rate of the daily living component
    (m) Armed forces independence payment 
    (n) Universal credit may be a qualifying benefit, if the payment includes 'limited capacity for work' calculations
    ​Certain carers ​ ​1.   People caring for someone in their home with a disability who is not their spouse, partner or a child under 18

    They must provide care for at least 35 hours a week and the person they are caring for must be in receipt of one of the following benefits:

    (a) Higher rate of attendance allowance
    (b) Lower rate of attendance allowance
    (c) Higher rate care component of disability living allowance 
    (d) Middle rate care component of disability living allowance 
    (e) An increase in constant attendance allowance under the industrial injuries or war pension scheme
    (f) Highest rate of constant attendance allowance payable on top of full rate disablement benefit paid for an industrial injury
    (g) The standard and enhanced rate of the daily living component of PIP
    (h) Armed forces independence payment

    2.   Care workers working for low pay, usually for charities, who are resident in the premises provided by or on behalf of their organisation, providing care for at least 24 hours a week and earning less than £44.00 per week.
    ​People in care homes ​People living in care homes (receiving care) as their only or main home.
    ​Hospital patients ​People who are a patient in hospital, which is their only or main home.​
    ​Residents in certain hostels and night shelters​ ​​​People living in a hostel for homeless people, for example, run by the Salvation Army or Church Army. 

    Most of the accommodation must be communal and most agreements to occupy the accommodation must be under licences which do not constitute tenancies. This applies to staff as well as residents.​
    ​Persons in prison or other forms of detention  ​To qualify, the person must be detained for one of the following reasons:

    (a) detained in prison or hospital by order of a court
    (b) detained under the Mental Health Act 1983
    (c) detained under the Immigration Act 1971
    (d) imprisoned, detained or in custody for more than 48 hours under the Army Act 1955, the Air Force Act 1955 or the Naval Discipline Act 1957

    If the person is in prison for non-payment of council tax or a fine, no discount can be awarded. 
    ​Members of religious communities ​Members of religious communities, for example monks and nuns. 
    ​Members of visiting forces  ​Members, and any of their dependents, of visiting forces and certain international institutions who are not British residents and not usually resident in the UK.
    ​Diplomatic, Commonwealth or consular privilege or immunity ​A person who has diplomatic, Commonwealth or consular privilege or immunity
    ​Members of international headquarters and defence organisations and their dependents ​A member (or dependent) of certain international headquarters or defence organisation listed in section 1 of the International Headquarters and Defence Organisations Act 1964.​
     ​

  • Empty Homes Review

    In support of the government's initiative to tackle the national shortfall in housing Chorley Council is undertaking a review of empty residential properties.

    The review is being carried out in partnership with CapacityGRID.

    If you have received a council tax empty homes review letter please click on the CapacityGRID useful link to complete a property update form. You will need your council tax account number and pin number provided in the review letter.

    If you need any help to complete the property update form please telephone CapacityGRID on 0300 303 2076.

  • Exemptions

    The following information is intended as guidance only and is not a full statement of the law.

    There are various exemptions that you may be able to claim to reduce your bill. If you claim an exemption and your circumstances change you must let us know within 21 days of the change or face a penalty.

    ​​Class of exemption Description
    ​B: Empty and owned by a charity ​An unoccupied property owned by a charity and last used by the charity in connection with its charitable objectives. 

    This exemption can only apply for a maximum of six months provided the charity retain ownership and the dwelling remains unoccupied.
    ​D: Empty due to a person being in prison or other forms of detention

    ​​The person must be detained for one of the following reasons:

    (a) detained in prison or hospital by order of a court
    (b) detained under the Mental Health Act 1983
    (c) detained under the Immigration Act 1971 
    (d) imprisoned, detained or in custody for more than 48 hours under the Army Act 1955, the Air Force Act 1955 or the Naval Discipline Act 1957

    If the person is in prison for non-payment of the council tax or a fine this exemption cannot be awarded.
    E: Empty due to the former resident moving to a hospital or care home​ ​An unoccupied property where the person who would be liable to council tax has left in order to live in a hospital, residential care home or hostel, where the person is receiving care or treatment is exempt.

    The exemption applies where the person has their sole or main residence in a hospital or care home etc. 
    ​F: Empty due to the death of the former resident ​An unoccupied property is exempt if the person who was liable to council tax has died, the property has remained unoccupied since the date of death and probate has not been granted.

    The exemption continues for six months after the grant of probate or after the letters of administration have been made.

    ​​G: Occupation prohibited by law​ ​A property is exempt if its occupation is forbidden by law, including if a planning condition prevents its occupancy (under the Town and Country Planning Act 1990), or if legal action is underway to prohibit its occupation or to acquire it under a compulsory purchase order.
    ​H: Empty and held for a minister of religion ​Vicarages and similar properties which are awaiting occupation by a minister of religion from where they will perform their duties.
    I: Empty due to the former resident moving to receive personal care​ ​Properties where a person has gone to live with someone else in order to receive care. 

    The relevant absentee must be receiving care due to old age, disablement, illness, past or present alcohol or drug dependence, or past or present mental disorder.​ 

    The unoccupied property must previously have been the sole or main residence of the absent person. 

    J: Empty due to the former resident moving to provide personal care​ ​This exemption applies where the owner or tenant has left a property unoccupied, having changed their place of residence in order to provide care for someone else. 

    The same reasons for the need for care apply as in Class I. The relevant absentee must have been away for this reason since they left. 

    ​​K: Left empty by a student ​Where a student is the owner of an unoccupied property it is exempt provided when it was last occupied it was the sole or main residence of that student, and that no one else, other than students, lived there.
    ​L: Mortgagee in possession ​An unoccupied property due to a mortgage lender (bank, building society or finance company) taking possession, usually because a borrower has failed to keep up mortgage repayments.
    ​M: Halls of residence  ​Halls of residence for students are exempt provided the accommodation is owned or managed by a prescribed educational establishment. The accommodation must be provided mainly for students, which does not prevent part being used to accommodate staff or other persons.
    ​N: Occupied only by students or relevant persons ​Any property which is occupied only by students and/or school or college leavers and/or student's spouse or dependant who is not a British citizen and cannot legally work or claim benefits, is exempt.

    If the students, or relevant persons, leave the property unoccupied during school/college holidays the exemption will continue if the students, or relevant persons, retain the right to occupy and has the intention to use the dwelling as term time accommodation

    ​O: UK armed forces accommodation ​Living accommodation for UK armed forces which is owned by the Secretary of State for Defence is exempt whether occupied or not. 

    This includes barracks and other accommodation on military bases, together with married quarters and any other property, wherever located, provided the accommodation is held for the purposes of forces accommodation. Contributions in lieu of council tax are payable to Local Authorities on such properties.

    ​P: Visiting forces accommodation  ​A property is exempt if at least one person who would be liable is a member (or dependant) of a visiting force and is neither a British citizen nor usually resident in the UK. 

    A property is exempt under this category even if not all liable persons are associated with a visiting force. For example, a property in which the liable persons are a visiting serviceman and his British wife would be exempt. 

    ​​Q: Unoccupied dwelling held by a trustee in bankruptcy  ​Where the person who would be liable to the council tax in respect of an unoccupied property is a trustee in bankruptcy, the property is exempt. 

    The exemption applies whether the unoccupied property is furnished or not.​

    ​R: Empty pitch and mooring  ​A pitch or mooring which is not occupied by a caravan or boat is exempt. 
    ​S: Occupied only by persons under 18  ​A property occupied only by a person or persons aged under 18 is exempt.
    ​T: Empty property which cannot be let separately  ​Where an unoccupied property forms part of a single property which includes another dwelling (for example an annex/granny flat) and cannot be let separately from that other dwelling without a breach of planning control. See also Class W.
    ​U: Occupied only by a severely mentally impaired person ​This applies to properties that are only occupied by a person or persons who are severely mentally impaired as defined for the purposes of council tax discount and who are entitled to or in receipt of one of the following benefits:

    (a) Incapacity benefit
    (b) Employment and support allowance 
    (c) Attendance allowance 
    (d) Severe disablement allowance 
    (e) Highest or middle rate care component of disability living allowance 
    (f) An increase in disablement pension for constant attendance 
    (g) Disability element of working tax credit Unemployability supplement 
    (h) Constant attendance allowance payable under the industrial injuries or war pension schemes
    (i) Unemployability allowance payable under the industrial injuries or war pension schemes 
    (j) Income support, which includes a disability premium because of incapacity for work
    (k) Personal Independence Payment (PIP) - Standard and enhanced rate of the daily living component
    (l) Armed forces independence payment 
    (m) Universal credit may be a qualifying benefit, if the payment includes 'limited capacity for work' calculations

    A dwelling is also exempt if it is only occupied by:
    (a) Severely​ mentally impaired person or persons and 
    (b) Students or relevant persons (for the purpose of the student exemption see Class N)

    You can apply for this exemption by using the Council tax severe mental impairment discount application form. 
    ​V: Diplomatic privilege or immunity  ​A property may be exempt from council tax if at least one person is either:

    (a) A person to whom privileges and immunities are conferred by the Diplomatic Privileges Act 1964; or 
    (b) A person on whom privileges and immunities are conferred under paragraph 5 (1) Part II of the Schedule to the Commonwealth Secretariat Act 1968; or
    (c) A person on whom privileges and immunities are conferred by section 1 of the Consular Relations Act 1968.

    And is not either:

    (a) British dependent Territories citizen, a British National (Overseas) or a British Overseas citizen; or 
    (b) A person who under British Nationality Act 1981 is a British subject; or
    (c) A British protected person; or
    (d) A permanent resident of the United Kingdom.

    There must be no other property in the United Kingdom, which is the main residence of that person, or is the main residence within the United Kingdom of that person.
    ​W: Occupied by a dependent relative  ​A property that forms part of a single property which includes another dwelling (for example an annex/granny flat) where a dependant relative lives. 

    (a) For the purpose of the Class W exemption a relative shall be regarded as dependant if they are either:
    Aged 65 years or more 
    (b) Severely mentally impaired within the meaning given in paragraph 2 of Schedule 1 to the Act; 
    or 
    (c) Substantially and permanently disabled (whether by illness, injury, congenital deformity or otherwise)

    A relative is defined as:
    (a) The spouse of that person; or 
    (b) The person's parent, grandparent, child, grandchild, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, nephew or niece or is the parent or child or such person, and 
        (i) relationship by marriage shall be treated as a relationship by blood 
        (ii) a relationship between a man and a woman living together as husband and wife shall be treated as a relationship by marriage
        (iii) a civil partnership 
        (iiii) The stepchild of a person shall be treated as his child

    See also Class T.. 

      
    Please note a change in ownership of the property does not entitle the property to a further period of exemption. If you think you qualify for an exemption or need more information please contact us. 

  • How to pay

    Direct debit
    Direct debit is the most efficient way to pay. You can pay by instalments over 10 or 12 months with a choice of payment dates, the 1st, 15th or 28th of each month. 

    Why pay by direct debit?
    • You have a choice of payment date
    • You don't have to remember to pay on the due date
    • You only need to sign one instruction unlike standing order, which must be renewed each year
    • No more cheques to write or letters to post
    • No more queueing to pay
    • Your bank or building society will make an immediate refund if any payment breaks the terms of your instruction
    • You can cancel the instruction at any time just by contacting your bank/building society

    You can set up a direct debit online or telephone us. 

    Online
    You will need to have your debit or credit card and your council tax account reference number to hand, you can find the number on your bill.

     
    We accept Switch, Visa, Mastercard, Maestro, Delta, Solo, JCB and Visa Purchasing.
     
    By telephone
    You can pay 24/7 by credit or debit card through our automated telephone payments system. Call 01257 511000 and quote your account reference number from your bill and your card details.
     
    If your reference number contains the letter X, when you are asked to key in your account reference number please replace the X with the * on your telephone keypad.
     
    At any Post Office or PayPoint outlet
    You can make your payment at Post Office and PayPoint outlets. Please take your bill with a barcode on the front when making payment and allow three working days for payment to reach your account. You can find your local Post Office branch through the useful link 'Find a Post Office'.​
     
    Through your bank/online banking
    You can arrange payment through your bank by quoting:
     
    A/C Name: Chorley Borough Council Collections Account
    Sort Code: 20-69-93
    A/C No: 63417069
    Account Branch Details: 23 Market Street, Chorley, Lancashire, PR7 2SY

    Please remember to quote your council tax account reference number with all payments and ensure that payment reaches us by the due date on your bill. 
  • Important changes for annexes from 1 April 2014

    From 1 April 2014 a discount of 50% has been introduced for annexes which are:

    1. occupied by a relative of the person liable to pay the council tax of the main dwelling; or
    2. ‘unoccupied’ as the person living in the main dwelling is using the annex as part of their main home

    Please note you may be able to claim an exemption if the annex is:

    1. occupied by a dependant relative; or
    2. unoccupied and cannot be let separately from the main dwelling without a breach of planning control

    Please contact us for further information and to apply.

  • Problems paying your bill?

    You must pay your council tax on time as shown on your bill. If you do not, we will send you a reminder. If your payments are not kept up to date following a reminder, you may receive a court summons for the total amount you owe. This means you will have significant court costs to pay.

    What if I can’t afford to pay?
    If you can’t afford to pay your bill, please contact us as soon as possible. Also check out if you are entitled to any discounts or exemptions to reduce your bill. 

    ​For free and independent advice, you can contact the Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) on 01772 424282 or Lancashire County Council Welfare Rights Team on 0845 053 0013

    ​CAB Community Champions can also help you find online information about debt, benefits, housing, employment and other issues in your own neighbourhood. For more information visit https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/debt-and-money/


    What do I need to do if I’ve received a summons?
    If you receive a summons, please pay your account and court costs in full before the court date or contact us if you wish to discuss your account and make a payment arrangement.

    What happens if I still don't pay?
    If your account remains unpaid and your case reaches court, we will ask the court to grant a liability order against you and will apply for additional liability order costs.

    Once we have obtained an order from the court, it has the authority to take the following recovery actions:
    • Refer your case to a certificated bailiff
    • Set up an attachment from your earnings if you're working
    • Set up a deduction from income support or employment and support allowance if you're not working
    • Apply for your committal to prison
    • Apply for you to be made bankrupt or make a charging order on your property

    If you have been issued with a summons the following information tells you what happens next.
    How can I stop the proceedings?
    By making a full payment of the council tax & costs shown on the summons before the hearing date. You can send your payment to PO Box 13, Chorley, PR7 1AR using the slip provided at the bottom of the summons or you can pay by telephone 24hours a day, 7 days a week using a debit or credit card on 01257 511000. If you do this the case will not be put to the Magistrates and no further costs will be added.

    What if I can't pay in full?
    Council tax staff will be happy to discuss payment with you at any time before the hearing and they may allow you time to pay depending on your circumstances. Please call the number shown on your summons to discuss payment.
    A free, impartial debt counselling service is also provided by the Citizens Advice Bureau.

    Will I still have to pay additional costs if I make an arrangement to pay before the hearing?
    Yes. We will apply for a liability order as explained  under 'What Will Happen At The Hearing' and costs will be added to your liability. However, we will take no further recovery action provided you make payment as we have agreed.

    What if I have written to you about my summons and not had a reply by the hearing date?
    We make every effort to answer letters before the hearing but this is not always possible. Even if you have written to us about your summons, we will still apply for a liability order for any amount left unpaid at the date of the hearing.

    Do I need to attend court?
    No. Only if you wish to appear in court and put forward a defence against the summons. One valid defence is that you have already paid the amount shown on the summons. If you paid before the summons was issued, please tell us so that we can trace your payment and cancel the proceedings. Please note that many enquires can be resolved prior to the hearing date. Please contact us if you require any other information.

    What will happen at the hearing?
    If you have not paid your summons in full, including the costs, we will ask the Magistrates to grant a 'Liability Order' for the amount unpaid plus further costs. This Liability Order allows us to take further action to recover the unpaid balance including the extra costs. After the hearing, we will send you a letter telling you what will happen next and how to avoid further action.

    Will the Magistrates decide how much I can pay?
    No. The Magistrates will only decide whether or not to grant a Liability Order.

    What if I have any other queries?
    Please do not write to the Court. Contact us and we will be able to help you with any questions you may have.

    If you have been issued with a committal summons the following information tells you what happens next:

    How can I stop the committal proceedings?
    By paying the balance shown on the committal summons in full before the hearing date. You can send your payment to Chorley Council, Union Street, Chorley, PR7 1AL using the slip provided at the bottom of the summons or you can pay by telephone 24 hours a day, 7 days a week using a debit or credit card on 01257 511000. If you do this, the case will not be put to the Magistrates and you will not incur any further costs.

    What if I can't pay in full?
    We will be happy to discuss payment with you at any time before the committal hearing and they may allow you time to pay depending on your circumstances. Please call the number shown on your summons to discuss payment.
    The Citizens Advice Bureau also provides a free, impartial debt counselling service.

    What happens if I make an arrangement to pay before the hearing?
    You will not need to attend the hearing. The case will be adjourned and your payments will be monitored. No further action will be taken provided you make payment as agreed.

    What if I have written to you about my committal summons and not had a reply by the hearing date?
    We make every effort to answer letters before the hearing, but this is not always possible. If you have not received a reply, you should then, attend court.

    Do I need to attend court for a committal summons hearing?
    Yes. It is only if you have paid in full or made a satisfactory payment arrangement that you don't need to attend.

    What will happen at the committal hearing?
    Our recovery officer may see you prior to the committal hearing.
    Alternatively, you may appear before the Magistrates who will enquire as to your means and conduct. They will then decide whether your failure to pay was due to wilful refusal or culpable neglect and, if so, whether you should be committed to prison.

    Will the Magistrates decide how much I can pay?
    If the Magistrates decide to allow you to make a payment arrangement, then they will decide how much you should pay.

    What if I have any other queries?
    Please do not write to the Court. Contact us and we will be able to help you with any questions you may have.

  • View your council tax details online using our e-Citizen service

    If you are an e-Citizen customer you can sign up to paperless billing and view your council tax details online.

    The following details are available:
    • The balance on your account
    • Payments you have made
    • Correspondence we have sent to you

    You can also set up a direct debit and find the council tax band for properties in Chorley.

    You will need to create an e-Citizen user name and password to be able to access your details. To do this use the view your council tax details online (e-citizen) link then click on the Register Now button.  
  • FAQs

    Has my bill increased?

    Chorley Council's element of the bill has increased by 2.99%. Due to roundings this is shown on your bill as 3%.

    On average, for band D property, the total payable amount in comparison to last year has increased by 4.8%

    Lancashire County Council's general part of the bill has increased by 2.99%. Lancashire County Council adult social care precept has increased by 1%.

    Police & Crime Commissioner for Lancashire's part of the bill has increased by 13.5%

    Lancashire Combined Fire Authority's part of the bill has increased by 3%.

    Why am I charged for Adult Social Care?
    From 2016/17 the government has allowed local authorities who are responsible for social care the ability to raise new funding to spend exclusively on adult social care.

    More information is available here, just type Council Tax in th​e search box.


    How is the % increase calculated for the LCC (Adult Social Care) part of my bill?
    The total LCC Council Tax charge has increased by 3.99% for 2019/20, which gives a total increase of £51.67 for a Band D property.

    £12.95 of this increase relates to the charge for Adult Social Care and represents a 1% increase on the total LCC Council Tax charge for 2018/19 of £1,294.92 for a Band D property.

    ​​​​​​​​​Lancashire County Council - Council Tax Increases for 2019/20 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

    2018/19 ​2019/20 ​2019/20 ​2019/20 ​​​ ​ ​ ​
    ​​Band D Example​​​ Precept Increase Precept Increase ​​​Calculation ​ ​ ​

    ​£ ​£ ​£ ​% ​​​% ​ ​
    LCC Basic Charge ​1,212.17 ​38.72 ​1,250.89 ​2.99 ​​​£38.72/£1,294.92 x 100 ​ ​ ​
    ​LCC Adult Social Care ​82.75 ​12.95 ​95.70 ​1.00 ​​​£12.95/£1,294.92 x 100 ​ ​ ​
    ​Total LCC Charge 1,294.92 51.67 ​1,346.59 3.99 ​​​ ​ ​ ​
    ​​​​​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​
    ​​​​​ ​£1,294.92 x 2.99% = £38.72 increase for LCC Basic Charge ​ ​ ​ ​
    ​​​​​​ ​£1,294.92 x 1.00​% = £12.95 increase for LCC Adult Social Care ​ ​ ​ ​
     
    The total Council Tax charge by LCC has increased by 3.99% for 2019/20 which gives a total increase of £51.67 for a Band D property. £12.95 of this increase relates to the charge for Adult Social Care and represents a 1% increase on the total LCC Council Tax Charge for 2018/19 of £1,294.92 for a Band D property.

    What are special expenses?
    Some people pay special expenses to Chorley Council for grass cutting and maintenance of open spaces that the council own and that are for the benefit of residents. The amount paid depends on the amount to maintain each area. The law says we need to call these special expenses.

    Where does my Council Tax money go?
    The make up of the average band D Council Tax, excluding special expenses, is as follows: -
    75%  Lancashire County Council
    11%  Chorley Council
    10%  Police & Crime Commissioner for Lancashire
      4%  Lancashire Combined Fire Authority

    Lancashire County Council's services include:
    • Education
    • Social Services
    • Highways
    • Libraries
    • Recreation
    • Tourism

    Chorley Council's services include:
    • Maintaining parks and open spaces – Care and maintenance of local open spaces, parks and recreation grounds 
    • Emptying your bins – Chorley has one of the best recycling rates in Lancashire
    • Environmental health – the food hygiene rating system makes it easier for you to check food safety standards           and make informed choices on where to eat
    • Licensing – ensuring pubs & off licences sell alcohol responsibly
    • Neighbourhood officers – tackle issues such as dog fouling and animal welfare
    • Leisure centres – we have three facilities across the borough to help people stay healthy
    • Planning and building control – we offer services to residents for new developments
    • Voluntary sector support – grants available to local community groups

    What is a parish precept?
    Each parish sets its own precept. This is the amount of money it would like to raise from its tax payers to allow it to carry out local projects and maintain assets that it owns in the parish. 

    I paid by direct debit last year - do I need to set this up again?
    As direct debit continues year on year, until either the bank or the customer cancels the instruction, it should still be in place.

    What can I do if I think my property is in the wrong band?
    Council tax valuation bands are allocated by the Valuation Office Agency and are based on the amount a property would have been sold for on 1 April 1991.

    You can appeal against your band by contacting the Valuation Office Agency.

    Why is a bar code shown on my bill?
    A barcode is printed on your bill to be used when making a payment at a Post Office or PayPoint outlet.

    What if I have lost my bill?
    If you misplace your bill please contact us.

    Why am I being charged 200%? What is this premium on my bill?
    From 1 April 2013 local authorities have the discretion to charge an additional premium on top of a full liability for long-term empty properties.

    From 1 April 2019 Chorley Council has decided to set the premium at 100% so the full charge will be 200%
     

    A ‘long-term empty’ property is one that has been unoccupied and substantially unfurnished for at least 24 months.

    The premium is intended to encourage owners of long-term empty homes to bring their properties back into use. It also supports work undertaken by the Council to reduce the number of long-term empty properties and make better use of existing housing in the borough. 
     
    I think I have been given the wrong discount – how can I appeal?
    Put your appeal in writing to us giving as much information as you can as to why you think the discount is wrong and we will contact you.

    Refunds
    You can request a refund if you have overpaid your council tax and your account is in credit. Refunds are usually paid direct into the bank account of the person/s named on the council tax bill. 

    If your payments were made by direct debit we will refund the bank account the payment/s were debited from. If you paid by credit or debit card the overpayment will be refunded to the card used to make the payment/s. 

    To apply for a refund you can telephone 01257 515431, email contact@chorley.gov.uk​​​ or download the ‘Request a Council Tax Refund’ form if you did not make payments by direct debit or using a credit/debit card. ​
     
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