Licensing

There are lots of activities that require a licence before you can carry them out legally. We administer some of these licences but not all.

These include everything from driving a taxi or running a pub or takeaway which opens late at night, to organising a public event, selling goods on the street or on the doorstep, running a lottery - even running specialist businesses such as an acupuncturist or putting a skip outside your home.

You can view licensing applications online  ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​


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  • Animal licences

    Animal boarding establishment
    To run a boarding kennel or cattery, you need a licence from us. The number of dogs and cats that may be accommodated will be specified on the licence along with other specific conditions. We may authorise an officer, veterinary surgeon or practitioner to inspect the licensed premises.

    Please contact us before you submit your application.

    An applicant must not be disqualified from any of the following at the time of the application:
    • Keeping an animal boarding
    • Keeping a pet shop under the Pet Animals Act 1951 establishment
    • Keeping animals under the Protection of Animals (Amendment) Act 1954
    • Owning, keeping, being involved in the keeping or being entitled to control or influence the keeping of animals, dealing in animals or transporting or being involved in the transportation of animals under the Animals Welfare Act 2006
    • Owning, keeping, dealing in or transporting animals under the Animal Health and Welfare (Scotland) Act 2006.

    In Scotland an applicant must also not be disqualified from working with, using, driving or riding animals, providing services to animals that would involve taking possession of them, taking possession of an animal to carry out any of the activities listed or taking charge of animals for any other purpose.

    The following criteria will be considered when the application is being evaluated:
    • That the animals will be kept in suitable accommodation at all times. Suitable accommodation takes into account the construction and size of the accommodation, the number of animals to be housed in it, facilities for exercising the animals, cleanliness and temperature, lighting and ventilation provisions
    • That suitable food, drink and bedding materials will be provided and that the animals are exercised and visited regularly
    • That steps are taken to prevent and control the spread of disease among the animals and that isolation facilities are in place
    • That adequate protection is provided to the animals in the case of fire and other emergencies
    • That a register is kept. The register should contain a description of all animals received, their arrival and departure date and the name and address of the owner. The register should be available to be inspected at any time by a local authority officer, veterinary surgeon or practitioner.

    It is in the public interest that we must process your application before it can be granted. If you have not heard from us within a reasonable period, please contact us. You can do this online if you applied through the UK Welcomes service.
    If your application fails you should contact us in the first instance if you are not happy with the decision.

    We would always advise that in the event of a complaint the first contact is made with the trader by you - preferably in the form a letter (with proof of delivery). If that has not worked, if you are located in the UK, Advice guide will give you advice. From outside the UK contact the UK European Consumer Centre.

    Pet shops
    To run a business selling pet animals you need a licence from us. This includes all commercial selling of pet animals, including pet shops and businesses selling animals over the internet. Applicants for a pet shop licence must not be disqualified from keeping a pet shop.


    We must have regard to the following when considering an application for a pet shop licence:
    • That animals will be kept in suitable accommodation, for example in regards to temperature, size, lighting,  ventilation and cleanliness
    • Adequate food and drink will be provided to the animals and they will be visited at suitable intervals
    • That any mammalian animals will not be sold too young
    • That steps are taken to prevent disease spreading among the animals
    • That adequate fire and emergency provisions are in place

    Conditions can be attached to a licence to ensure that the above are complied with.

    If your application fails and you are not happy with the decision then you should contact us in the first instance.

    We would always advise that in the event of a complaint the first contact is made with the trader by you  preferably in the form a letter (with proof of delivery). If that has not worked, if you are located in the UK, Advice guide will give you advice. From outside the UK contact the UK European Consumer Centre.

    Dog breeding
    Since the Breeding and Sale of Dogs (Welfare) Act 1999 was introduced it is an offence to keep a breeding establishment for dogs without a licence from your Local Authority.

    On deciding whether to grant a licence for the first time we are required to arrange inspection of the premises by a Veterinary Surgeon/Practitioner and our animal welfare officer. 

    The cost of the initial vet inspection fee depends on the size of premises and numbers of animals involved.
    An annual renewal fee of £78 is payable, this amount is subject to change annually
  • Caravan sites

    The Caravan and Control of Development Act 1960 prohibits the use of land as a caravan site unless the occupier holds a site licence issued by the local authority. For a summary of regulations visit the GOV.UK website. Alternatively you can contact us for more information on fees and charges.

    Conditions and/or requirements
    Licences have conditions which include:
    • The type of caravan, e.g. residential, static holiday or touring
    • The permitted density (the number per acre/hectare) and the spacing between caravans
    • Water supply and drainage; lavatory and washing facilities
    • Fire precautions and electrical installations

    Exceptions
    There are some exceptions:
    • A caravan sited with the curtilage of a dwelling and its use is incidental to the dwelling. This means it cannot be occupied separately
    • A single caravan sited for not more than two consecutive nights for a maximum of 28 days in any 12 months
    • Up to three caravans on a site of not less than five acres for a maximum of 28 days in any 12 months
    • Sites occupied by exempted organisations such as the Caravan Club
    • Sites of up to five caravans certified by an exempt organisation and which are for members only
    • Sites occupied by the local authority. These are usually gypsy sites
    • Sites for temporary and special purposes such as caravan rallies, agricultural and forestry workers, building and engineering sites and travelling salesmen
    • A site for tents only can be used for a maximum of 28 days in any 12 months
     
    Things to bear in mind
    If you are a caravan site occupier  you should have a licence already but you should check that your name, the site name and address is correct and up-to-date. Also check that the licence corresponds with your planning permission. If not, you should send us the licence for re-issue.

    If you have recently become a caravan site occupier licences are transferable to a new occupier but the law requires us to give consent for the transfer. You should send us the licence with a request for transfer and we will either endorse o​r re-issue it.

    If you are a potential site occupier  you or your legal advisor should check that all the land used for siting caravans has planning permission and that the details correspond with the site licence. If you wish to change the use of the land to a permanent caravan site use you must have planning permission before a licence can be issued.
     
    Applying for a licence
    An application must be completed and accompanied by a site plan at 1:500 scale showing the layout of roads, caravans and facilities.

  • Charities and gambling
    Charities

    House-to-house collections
    To carry out house-to-house collections for charitable purposes in England and Wales you need a licence from us. You can apply for this online.

    Street collections
    To collect money or sell articles for the benefit of charitable or other purposes in England and Wales, you require a street collection licence from us. You can apply for this online.


    Gambling

    The Gambling Act 2005
    The Gambling Act 2005 began to take effect from 1st January 2007 and is now in full force.


    All Premises Licences are now granted by the Licensing Authority (Chorley Council) rather than the Magistrates Courts. The Act will be regulated by the newly formed Gambling Commission, who are also responsible for issuing some licences.

    Licensing objectives
    The new Gambling Act focuses on three licensing objectives:
    • Preventing gambling from being a source of crime, being associated with crime or being used to support crime
    • Ensuring that gambling is conducted in a fair and open way
    • Protecting children and other vulnerable persons from being harmed or exploited by gambling.

    Licence types
    Under the Gambling Act 2005 there are three types of licences that are required to run facilities for gambling. 

    An operators licence
    Required by individuals or companies who intend to provide facilities for gambling. This is granted by the Gambling Commission.

    A personal licence
    Required by the directors/managers (Personal Management Licence) and by those performing operational functions e.g. croupiers (Personal Functional Licence). All personal licences are granted by the Gambling Commission. 

    A premises licence
    This is issued by us, for all premises within the borough, and is required for the premises where the gambling will take place. Licences last indefinitely and an annual fee will be payable.

    The following premises will require a Premises Licence:
    • Casino
    • Bingo Premises
    • Betting Premises, including Tracks
    • Adult Gaming Centre (AGC)
    • Family Entertainment Centre (FEC)

    A number of permits are granted under the Act and we will be responsible for issuing permits for:
    • Gaming Machines on alcohol-licensed premises
    • Gaming machines for members clubs
    • Unlicensed Family Entertainment Centre (Category D machines only) - Prize Gaming
    • Small Society Lottery Registrations

    As the Licensing Authority, we will also:
    • Grant Temporary Use Notices (TUNs) - Grant Occasional Use Notices (OUNs)
    • Grant provisional statements (for premises not yet built)
    • Keep a register of all licences, permits, notices and registrations
    • Monitor and enforce the authorizations they issue.
    • Set fees within bands.

    The Magistrates will hear any premises licence appeals.

    In dealing with Gambling Act applications we will follow their Statement of Principles. This policy will be reviewed every three years. We will also abide by the Gambling Commission Code of Practice.

    Gaming machine permits for alcohol licensed premises
    Under the Gambling Act 2005 alcohol licensed premises will have an automatic entitlement to provide one or two C or D category machines. To take advantage of this entitlement the premises licence holder must give notice of their intention to the Licensing Authority and must pay the prescribed fee. The Licensing Authority has no power to turn this notification down. The Licensing Authority is able to remove this automatic entitlement by making an order under Section 284 of the Gambling Act 2005.

    A Licensed Premises Gaming Machine Permit may be applied for if a premises wishes to have more than two category C and D machines. This must be applied for two months before the current permit expires. This is subject to an annual fee.


    Club permits 


    Club gaming permit
    This is available to Member's Clubs only. This permit authorises up to three B4, C or D category machines. This also allows very limited facilities for gambling subject to restrictions and conditions.

    Club machine permit
    This is available to both Member's Clubs and Commercial Clubs. This permit authorises up to three B4, C or D category machines, however no other form of gaming is permitted. There is a fast track application procedure for the above applications for Clubs who hold a Club Premises Certificate under the Licensing Act 2003.

    Small Society Lotteries
    Some lotteries require a licence from us please check the lottery guidance notes to see if you require a licence.

    On 1st September 2007 existing registrations that were current on that date were converted automatically into a registration under the new act. A similar system of registration operates under the new act. The first annual fee under the new act became due on 1st January 2008.

    You are now required to abide by all the rules relating to small society lotteries in the new Gambling Act 2005. Details of these will be forwarded onto affected societies as they become available.

    Our Small society lotteries application form is available to download.

    For further information you could look on the government culture website or the Gambling Commission site 

    The Gambling Act 2005 also provides new legislation regarding the following:
    • Casinos
    • Tracks
    • Pool Promoters
    • Society Lotteries
    • External Lottery Managers
    • Gaming Machine Suppliers and Repairers
    • Supply and Maintenance of single machines
    • Prize Gaming Permits
    • Remote Gambling Operators
    • Other betting based permissions
  • Food licences
    Food premises registration
    To store, prepare, distribute or sell food on premises you need to be registered with the local authority. Premises include restaurants, cafes, hotels, shops, canteens, market stalls, mobile catering vans and food delivery vans.

    If you are uncertain whether your business needs to be approved or registered, contact us.

    Food premises approval - slaughter and meat processing, preparation or storage
    If you operate food premises you may need to be approved by us. Examples of types of premises that are required to be approved by local authorities are stand alone (i.e. not attached to a slaughter house, cutting plant or game handling establishment).

    You should contact us to see if you require approval for premises such as these:
    • Meat processing plants
    • Meat preparation plants
    • Minced meat processing operations and mechanically separated meat processing plants
    • Cold stores

    You can apply for both of these online.

    Pavement cafe 
    The Chorley pavement café design & licence guide is a document that will support the regeneration, economic development and vitality of the town centre.
     
    It specifically focuses on Chorley town centre and seeks to implement objectives within the town centre strategy, which was adopted in October 2006. The policy also supports the establishment of pavement cafés outside the town centre, within surrounding villages subject to compliance with planning policy, particularly in conservation areas.
     
    Purpose
     The purpose of this design and licence guide is:
     • To ensure that any pavement café makes a positive contribution to the street scene whilst considering the needs of all highway users.
     • To ensure that any pavement café operation is of a high standard, run in accordance with specified requirements and standards.
     • To guide those wishing to establish and/or operate pavement cafés through the necessary licensing and planning processes.
     
    Design
    Where pavement cafés are not located on privately owned land, they will usually be sited on part of the highway. Together with Lancashire County Council, we have approved a scheme under which certain amenities (e.g. pavement cafés) may be provided on specified areas of public highway. In order to operate a pavement café on the highway under this scheme, a Highways Amenities Licence must be obtained.
     
    The licensing process will take between 6-8 weeks and licences are renewable annually.

     If you wish to apply see our pavement café design & licence guide.
  • Licensing consultations

    Members of the public can comment on certain licensing applications we have received under the Licensing Act 2003. Applications are only open to consultation if it is a brand new application or it is to vary an existing application, which means they want to extend their hours or allow activities that are not currently licensed for.

  • Personal licence
    There are new requirements for this application in relation to the Immigration Act 2016 which requires you to provide proof that you are entitled to live and work in the UK​.

    A personal licence enables an individual to sell/supply, or to authorise the sale/supply of alcohol. The personal licence is separate from the licence that authorises the premises to be used for the supply of alcohol.

    All premises licences authorising the sale of alcohol must have an identified personal licence holder known as the designated premises supervisor. This ensures there is always one specified individual who can be identified at a premises where a premises licence is in force. This person will usually be responsible for the day-to-day running of the premises. There is no requirement for a designated premises supervisor or a personal licence holder to be present and named on a Club Premises Certificate.

    To apply for a personal licence applicants must submit:
    • Personal licence application form
    • Disclosure of convictions and declarations form
    • Basic disclosure check;
    • Certificate showing applicant has passed an accredited qualification;
    • Two photographs, one endorsed as a true likeness by someone of standing in the community
    • A fee payable to us
    • UK/EC passport
  • Premises licence

    To provide late-night refreshments or regulated entertainment, and sell alcohol, you need a licence from us if you are in England and Wales. 

    Any of the following may apply for a premises licence:
    • Anyone who carries on a business in the premises to which the application relates
    • A recognised club
    • A charity
    • A health service body
    • A person who is registered under the Care Standards Act 2000 in relation to an independent hospital
    • A chief police officer of a force in England and Wales
    • Anyone discharging a statutory or function under Her Majesty's prerogative
    • A person from an educational institute
    • Any other permitted person

    Applicants must not be under 18 years of age.

  • Scrap metal dealers

    From 1 October 2013 the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 1964 and the Motor Salvage Operators Regulation 2002 are replaced by the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013.

    Under the new legislation we will only issue licences to applicants we see suitable to carry out business as a scrap metal dealer.

    There are two types of licence:

    Collector's licence
    This licence allows you to collect scrap metal within the borough of Chorley.

    To apply for a licence you must fill out an application form and a disclosure of convictions and declarations form. A fee of  £130.00 is payable.

    To transport scrap metal you will also need a Waste Carriers Licence issued by the Environment Agency. 

    Site licence
    This licence allows you to operate a site within the borough of Chorley and collect scrap metal nationally.

    You may also need planning permission to carry out business from the site.

    To apply for a licence you must fill out an application form and a disclosure of convictions and declarations form.  A fee of £280.00 is payable.

    The application form, disclosure of convictions and declarations form and guidance notes to help you with your application are available to download.

  • Taxi licensing
    Taxi Operator
    A private hire operator's licence is required to enable a person to accept or invite bookings for private hire vehicles. Before a private hire operator licence is granted the applicant must satisfy the local authority that the address from which they intend to operate is suitable (planning permission may be required) and, where applicable, satisfy any conditions that may be attached to the licence in order not to disturb the amenity of the area.

    Contact us for details on applying to become a licensed operator.

    Drivers
    We are responsible for the licensing of the drivers of both private hire and hackney carriage drivers. We ensure that all drivers are 'fit and proper' persons to be licensed, by carrying out checks on an applicant's background.

    Applicants are required to complete a medical examination, Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), knowledge test, driving assessment in addition to a check on the applicant's driving licence history with the DVLA when applying for a licence. A passport or original documentation to confirm the applicant's right to work in the UK must also be provided.

    You can apply online for a DBS by clicking on the link in the Do It Online section​.

    You can book a driving assessment online through one of our approved providers:

    Blue Lamp Trust
    Diamond Advanced Motorists
    Green Penny

    by clicking on one of the links in the Do It Online Section.

    Before completing the medical examination form you may find it useful to download the DVLA - Medical Examination Report Information

    Contact us for details on applying to become a licensed driver.​


    Hackney carriage taxi licence

    All hackney carriages can be hailed/flagged down in the street by potential passengers. They can also be found waiting at taxi ranks in the town. The law also allows hackney carriages to be used as private hire vehicles.

    Each hackney carriage displays a licence plate at the rear of the vehicle. Licensed hackney carriage drivers must wear their badge, which contains their photo and licence number, at all times they are driving a hackney carriage.
     
    Will tacit consent apply?
    No. It is in the public interest that the authority must process your application before it can be granted. If you have not heard from the local authority within a reasonable period, please contact us. You can do this online if you applied through the UK Welcomes service or contact us

    What if my application fails?
    You should contact us in the first instance if you are not happy with the decision.

    Consumer complaint
    We would always advise that in the event of a complaint the first contact is made with the trader by you - preferably in the form a letter (with proof of delivery). If that has not worked, if you are located in the UK, Adviceguide will give you advice. From outside the UK contact the UK European Consumer Centre.

    Vehicles
    We are responsible for the licensing of both private hire and hackney carriage vehicles. In order for a vehicle to be licensed for use as either private hire or hackney carriage, the following documents must be produced:
    • V5 Registration document
    • MOT
    • Taxi test
    • Appropriate insurance cover

    Contact us for details on licensing a vehicle.
  • Temporary Events Notice (TEN)
    A Temporary Event Notice (TEN) is a notification given by an individual to us giving notice of an event that is to take place. TENs relate to temporary events with less than 500 attendees where 'licensable activities' are planned to take place.

    The system involves an event organiser (the "premises user") giving a TEN to the licensing authority and informing Lancashire Police and  environmental health. If the premises where the event is to be held is in areas governed by two or more local authorities applications must be made to each.

    Useful information

    How to apply

    You should apply online for a temporary event notice in the do it online section
    You will be able to pay online and we will notify Lancashire Police and environmental health for you.

    Regulated entertainment
    Where your application for a Temporary Event Notice is solely for the provisional of the live music you may be exempt from requiring any form of licence providing you meet the following requirements.

    Unamplified live music
    Unamplified live music is exempt form licensing between the hours 08:00 and 23:00, there is no restriction on audience size.

    Amplified live music
    Licensed premises and work places are exempt from requiring a licence for live amplified music between the hours 08:00 and 23:00 for an audience off 200 or less.

    Eligibility criteria
    • The premises user must be over 18 years old
    • No more than 499 persons can attend the event (this includes staff working at the event)
    • The number of times a premises user may give a TEN (50 times in a calendar year for a personal licence holder and 5 times in a calendar year for other people)
    • The number of times a TEN may be given for any particular premises (15 times in a calendar year)
    • The maximum length of time a TEN may have effect (168 hours or 7 days)
    • A period of 24 hours must elapse between TENs

    Regulations
    • No more than 499 persons can attend the event (this includes staff working at the event)
    • The number of times a premises user may give a TEN (50 times in a calendar year for a personal licence holder and 5 times in a calendar year for other people)
    • The number of times a TEN may be given for any particular premises (15 times in a calendar year)
    • The maximum length of time a TEN may have effect (168 hours or 7 days)
    • A period of 24 hours must elapse between TEN's
     
    A summary of the regulation relating to this licence:
    Standard TENs
    Should the licensing authority receive an objection notice from the police or our environmental health service that is not withdrawn, it must hold a hearing to consider the objection (unless all parties agree that is unnecessary). The licensing committee may decide to allow the licensable activities to go ahead as stated in the notice. If the notice is in connection with licensable activities at licensed premises, the licensing authority may also impose one or more of the existing licence conditions on the TEN if it considers that this is appropriate for the promotion of the licensing objectives. If the authority decides to impose conditions, it must give notice to the premises user which includes a statement of conditions and provide a copy to each relevant party. Alternatively, it can decide that the event would undermine the licensing objectives and should not take place. In this case the licensing authority must give a counter notice.

    Although ten clear working days is the minimum possible notice that may be given, we would advise applicants to submit their TEN at the earliest opportunity to ensure all necessary controls can be put in place. 

    Please note that the minimum 10 days does not include the date the application is received the date of the event any weekends or bank holidays. Applications received outside of office hours (after 5pm) are treated as received the next working day.

    Late TENs
    A Late TEN can be submitted to us not before 9 and not later than 5 working days before the event.

    Please note that the minimum 5 days does not include the date the application is received the date of the event any weekends or bank holidays. Applications received outside of office hours (after 5pm) are treated as received the next working day.

    As with a standard TEN, the police and our environmental protection service have a period of three working days from when they are given the notice to object to it on the basis of any of the four licensing objectives. If there is an objection from either service, the event will not go ahead. In these circumstances there is no scope for a hearing or the application of existing conditions.

    A late TEN given less than five days before the event to which it relates will be returned as void and the activities to which it relates will not be authorised.

    The number of late TENs that can be given in a calendar year is limited to ten for personal licence holders and two for non-personal licence holders. Late TENs count towards the total number of TENs (for example, the limit of five TENs per year for non-personal licence holders and fifty TENs for personal licence holders). Once these limits have been reached, the licensing authority should issue a counter notice (permitted limits) if any more are given.

    The evaluation process
    Where a TEN is submitted electronically then we will give a copy of the notice to Lancashire Police and environmental health no later than the end of the first working day after the day on which the notice was received by us.
    If either responsible authority receives a notice and believes that the event would undermine any of the licensing objectives they can serve an objection notice on the licensing authority and the premises user. This notice must be served within 72 hours of receipt of the temporary event notice.

    The local licensing authority must hold a hearing if an objection notice is served in relation to a standard TEN. They may issue a counter notice if it considers it necessary for the promotion of crime prevention objective. A decision must be made at least 24 hours before the beginning of the event.

    A police chief may modify the TEN with the consent of the premises user. In such a case an objection notice will be deemed to have been withdrawn.

    Counter notices may be provided by the licensing authority if the number of permitted TENs has been exceeded.

    Failed application and licence holder redress
    Contact us in the first instance.

    Consumer complaint
    We would always advise that in the event of a complaint the first contact is made with the trader by you - preferably in the form a letter (with proof of delivery). If that has not worked, if you are located in the UK, Consumer Direct will give you advice. From outside the UK contact the UK European Consumer Centre.


  • Trading and shops

    Second hand goods
    To deal in second hand goods, you may need a licence from, or to be registered with, us. You may be required to keep records of each transaction.

     For more information see the second hand dealer's regulations.

    Sex shops and cinemas
    To run a sex shop - i.e. any premises selling sex toys, books or videos - you may need a licence from us. To run a venue where explicit films are shown to members of the public, you also need a licence from us. However, you may apply to us requesting them to waive the requirement of a licence.

    Street trader
    If you trade in the street you may require a street trading licence. Applications should be made in writing (including by electronic means) to us, or the district council for the area you wish to trade.

    • You must provide specific information, including details of the street you wish to trade on and the days and times you wish to trade
    • You may also be required to provide two photographs of yourself
    • You must comply with any conditions attached to a licence

    Tattoo, piercing, acupuncture and electrolysis
    You need a licence to carry out this type of business in Chorley. To apply for a licence you can download and complete the relevant application form and send it to us with a copy of your qualification certificate.